Archive by Author

Something Old, Something New, by Reed Lackey

28 Feb

AmberandClayOnSteps

One of my biggest criticisms of the genre known as the “Christian film” is that the films too often feel reactionary. Rather than being created from a desire to tell a good story and tell it well, many films in the “Christian” genre are responding to a specific cultural condition with a specific message and an undeniable agenda.

The latest film to fall into this category is Old Fashioned, written and directed by Rik Swartzwelder, who also stars as the lead role opposite Elizabeth Roberts. The film centers around a couple whose romance is more akin to “courtship” than dating and was specifically marketed as the Evangelical response to 50 Shades of Grey. I should be upfront about the fact that I wasn’t expecting much from it.

But the marketing campaign was probably a disservice to the film because what I saw offered me a few surprises, which not only endeared it to me as a positive entry in the “Christian film” genre, but also gave me some glimmers of hope for where that genre might be headed.

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For Mr. Nimoy, by Reed Lackey

27 Feb

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For most of my life, and likely for all of the rest of it, I have been torn between whether I will be governed by my reason or by my emotions. I’m a critical thinker and a logical problem solver with a deductive-reasoning mindset. I’m also a highly sensitive and often emotionally vulnerable man.

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Minisode 58: Birdman

27 Feb

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In this minisode, Tyler and Josh discuss the winner of Best Picture for 2014, Birdman.

An Open Letter to Christian Filmmakers, by Joe Zaragoza

20 Feb

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I just got out of seeing the movie Old Fashioned. Here are some things I noticed: It was a Monday morning and the theater was packed. The movie was getting laughs from the audience throughout. When the movie ended, people applauded it. Also, as I was leaving, an older woman sitting in my aisle with her husband asked me, “Wasn’t that a wonderful movie?” while I heard another person say, “There needs to be more movies like this.” Now, if this is your audience, if this is who you are making movies for, then good job! You guys are succeeding. Not just Old Fashioned, but all Christian films. I remember leaving God’s Not Dead and seeing people genuinely excited about it, pulling out their cell phones, I’m guessing to text people, “God’s Not Dead” as the movie instructs, and then myself receiving the text “God’s Not Dead!” for several weeks after that from random Christian friends. You have an audience. Christians are going to your movies and they are going to continue to go to your movies.

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Episode 124: with special guest Reed Lackey

19 Feb

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In this episode, Tyler is joined by Reed Lackey to discuss 50 Shades of Grey, The Wicker Man, and discernment.

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18 Feb

Minisode 57: Rain Man

13 Feb

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In this minisode, Tyler and Josh discuss the Best Picture of 1988, Rain Man, directed by Barry Levinson.

Episode 123: Birdman

6 Feb

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In this episode, Tyler and Josh discuss Alejandro G. Inarritu’s Birdman and Spike Jonze’s Adaptation.

EPISODE BREAKDOWN

00:00:44- Intro, The Imitation Game, That’s Not Funny
00:02:45- International Christian Film Festival- Donations Welcome
00:05:10- Birdman
01:11:10- Adaptation.
01:35:10- Episode wrap-up

Puzzle Maker, by Reed Lackey

3 Feb

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Picture with me, for a moment, a machine. It has its own circuits, electrical impulses, and energy source. But this machine’s purpose extends beyond programmable functions to re-programmable functions. In other words, this machine can learn, can reason, and can deduce. It can evolve.

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Tolerance, by Robert Hornak

1 Feb

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Whether or not you are Charlie Hebdo, current events make it obvious that comedy can be a lightning rod for dubiously justified anger.  It’s always been so, as Mike Celestino’s ambitiously-scoped documentary That’s Not Funny illustrates, but the shock is that these days the expression of that anger can run the broad gamut from heckling a comedian to storming the offices of a leftist humor magazine with automatic weapons.  Perhaps perversely, one aches while watching the film, which was produced before the Paris attack, wishing Celestino had just waited a few more months so he could include that most tragic of examples.  But there’s enough grist for the mill in the history of American comedy to help him preach his sermon, and Celestino covers it all.

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