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Get Out

18 Oct

In this episode, Tyler and Reed discuss Jordan Peele’s Get Out.

The Neon Demon

14 Oct

In this episode, Tyler and Josh discuss Nicolas Winding Refn’s The Neon Demon.

Split

11 Oct

In this episode, Tyler and Robert discuss M. Night Shyamalan’s Split.

The Witch

9 Oct

In this 2017 episode, Tyler and Reed discuss Robert Eggers’ The Witch.

Jacob’s Ladder

9 Oct

In this episode from 2015, Tyler and Reed are joined by Jim Rohner to discuss Jacob’s Ladder.

Nosferatu

5 Oct

In this episode from 2014, Tyler and Josh discuss the classic horror film Nosferatu.

Bill Oberst Jr.

3 Oct

In this episode from 2013, Tyler and Josh interview horror film staple Bill Oberst Jr. about his career.

Horror Movies

1 Oct

In this episode from 2011, Tyler and Josh discuss the Christian attitude towards horror films.

That’s Ministry! by Tyler Smith

12 May

At this very moment, all over the internet, one can find classified ads seeking out actors and crew members for films shooting in and around Los Angeles. These ads often give general details, such as the length of the shoot and perhaps a few specifics about the type of film being shot. As you skim these ads, you’ll eventually arrive at the pay rate, which, more often than not, is “low/no”, meaning that those involved likely won’t be getting paid. The ads will often specify, however, that actors and crew members will be compensated in the form of “exposure”.

[…]

Cinematic Suffering now available!

15 Apr

We’ve all seen terrible movies. Films that are so bad, they actually make us angry. Clumsy writing, stilted acting, and half-hearted visuals all contribute to some of our worst moviegoing experiences.

In his new book Cinematic Suffering, Tyler suggests that there’s always a silver lining, and we can still learn something from even the most painfully-bad films. The book contains reviews of studio misfires, shameless Oscar bait, ridiculous horror movies, and some films whose very existence defies all reason!

Cinematic Suffering is now available for purchase for only $15!

Books can be delivered only within the United States. Please allow two weeks for delivery.