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Episode 230: I Still Believe

10 Jul

In this episode, Tyler is joined by Kevin McCreary to discuss the Erwin Brothers’ I Still Believe and Brad Silberling’s Moonlight Mile.

Faith-based Optimism, by Bob Connally

10 May

Why are Christian movies so terrible? That’s a question many of us have been asking now for decades. The answer is simple really. Low production values, inexperienced actors, inexperienced directors, but most of all, cringe-inducing screenplays that lead with their message. They become films designed to be sermons more than movies. In his new documentary, Reel Redemption: The Rise of Christian Cinema, Tyler Smith of course examines those aspects of Christian filmmaking but he also goes much deeper into the relationship between Christianity and Hollywood over the past century.

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Faithlife Interview

5 May

Tyler on Say Goodnight Kevin

2 May

Tyler was recently a guest on the Say Goodnight Kevin podcast to talk about his new documentary Reel Redemption.

Into the Wilderness, by Tober Corrigan

9 Apr

“Then Jesus was led up by the spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil, and when he had fasted forty days and forty night, afterward he was hungry.” – Matthew 4:1-2

Using the above as its narrative basis, Douglas James Vail’s 40: The Temptation of Christ takes on the task of explaining what exactly happened during those 40 days and nights. Aside from the three temptations of the devil, everything else that could have happened in the wilderness has been left to the imagination. Screenwriter Reed Lackey takes it from there, dancing a fine line between respect for the source material (all of Jesus’ dialogue comes from scripture) and using speculation to guide the film’s deeper emotional truths. 

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A Long Way to Go, by Bob Connally

9 Feb

The first episode of VidAngel’s biblical television series The Chosen is a mostly dull approximation of a cable prestige drama. To the show’s credit, there is an attempt at production value but it doesn’t do much to draw us in over its first hour.

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Over Pressure, by Reed Lackey

22 Oct

In the realm of faith-based films, perhaps the least likely of sub-genres to encounter (second only to out-right horror) is the suspense thriller. The challenges in developing a compelling narrative while still making the film accessible to families are numerous. Tackling those challenges in his most recent film, Thy Neighbor, is director George A. Johnson, who has managed to craft a compelling and provocative suspense film, even if it does still succumb to some of the usual difficulties of both the suspense and faith-based genres.

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That’s Ministry! by Tyler Smith

12 May

At this very moment, all over the internet, one can find classified ads seeking out actors and crew members for films shooting in and around Los Angeles. These ads often give general details, such as the length of the shoot and perhaps a few specifics about the type of film being shot. As you skim these ads, you’ll eventually arrive at the pay rate, which, more often than not, is “low/no”, meaning that those involved likely won’t be getting paid. The ads will often specify, however, that actors and crew members will be compensated in the form of “exposure”.

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Episode 215: I Can Only Imagine

9 Aug

In this episode, Tyler and Reed discuss the Erwin Brothers’ I Can Only Imagine and James Mangold’s Walk the Line.

What’s the Point? by Tim Acheson

16 Jun

Even as I would continually pause my viewing of Revelation Road: The Black Rider to listen to Indie music or watch a clip from Mad Max: Fury Road, keeping with the Bible’s command to only concern oneself with what is excellent and praiseworthy (Philippians 4:8), there is this much I can say not just for The Black Rider, but for the Revelation Road trilogy as a whole: I consider it a guilty pleasure. Not as offensive as the God’s Not Dead duology but, with its writing, acting, directing and special effects, nowhere near reaching the heights of post-apocalyptic fare like The Book of Eli, The Revelation Road films are, at their best, films to be laughed at in the company of friends, in the tradition of so-bad-it’s-good films like Birdemic: Shock and Terror.

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