The Fear of God: Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

16 Oct

In this episode, Reed and Nathan discuss the 1978 remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

3 Responses to “The Fear of God: Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)”

  1. FictionIsntReal October 16, 2019 at 5:50 pm #

    Whenever any version of a “pod people” story comes up, I like to link to Robin Hanson’s critique of our basis for considering pods to be bad.

    Violence is actually down compared to prior decades. Read Pinker on “Better Angels of Our Nature”.

    I was surprised to hear you quote someone on a conservative approach fitting a younger age, since conservatism is known correlated with older age, particularly being married with children.

    Don’t you strive to believe that which is true? If Trump is offended by you not believing he’s a genius, should that have any effect on your beliefs?

  2. FictionIsntReal October 16, 2019 at 5:53 pm #

    One thing I intended to include in my prior comment is related to Hanson’s argument: since pod people assimilate all, they are actually more prone to uniting than the rest of humanity, who naturally tend to divide. The pod people have more solidarity between each other than regular humans, which is part of what makes them seem like a scary threat. Of course, it is a common cognitive bias to see our enemies as more uniform and united compared to our friends/allies.

  3. Reed October 24, 2019 at 11:30 am #

    That observation goes back to the difference between uniting and homogenizing. There is a vast world of difference between uniting distinct components and creating a uniform mush. The pod people in the film specifically identify that they have no need for hatred or love. They are essentially devoid of those “divisive” qualities. Whether or not the homogenization would be more prudent or effective or beneficial to the individuals (or to the planet at large) is a different conversation than the threat that simply exists which states — to become you, I have to lose what makes me “me”. Anyone whose instincts of self-preservation are in tact would resist that to the fullest extent of their will.

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